insidenatgeo

National Geographic Society

A look at the innovative people and bold ideas behind @natgeo ’s yellow border. #insidenatgeo

Today marks the anniversary of a discovery that altered prevailing views about human evolution: In 1959, pioneering paleoanthropologist Mary Leakey found a 1.75-million-year-old shattered hominid skull in current-day Tanzania. #insidenatgeo

Today marks the anniversary of a discovery that altered prevailing views about human evolution: In 1959, pioneering paleoanthropologist Mary Leakey found a 1.75-million-year-old shattered hominid skull in current-day Tanzania. #insidenatgeo - 16 hours ago

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"I think of storytelling as an ancient tradition that I am grateful to be a part of. Photo Camp is an opportunity to exchange and share techniques and tools as well as discover new ways of communicating," says photographer Erika Larsen (@erikalarsen888), who will be teaching the youth of Alaska's Quinhagak community to amplify their voices through photography at Photo Camp this week. "I am eager to work with the Quinhagak community because the Yupik come from an old line of storytellers. I believe the world has a lot to learn from their voices and ways of communicating." Follow @ngphotocamp to see more throughout the week. Portrait of Erika by @chamiltonjames. #insidenatgeo

"I think of storytelling as an ancient tradition that I am grateful to be a part of. Photo Camp is an opportunity to exchange and share techniques and tools as well as discover new ways of communicating," says photographer Erika Larsen (@erikalarsen888 ), who will be teaching the youth of Alaska's Quinhagak community to amplify their voices through photography at Photo Camp this week. "I am eager to work with the Quinhagak community because the Yupik come from an old line of storytellers. I believe the world has a lot to learn from their voices and ways of communicating." Follow @ngphotocamp to see more throughout the week. Portrait of Erika by @chamiltonjames. #insidenatgeo - 2 days ago

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The waters of Portugal's Azores archipelago are home to some of the most crucial ecosystems in the North Atlantic, including megafauna hotspots that host whales, dolphins, and deep-sea sharks. Eager to explore the area's never-surveyed seamounts, the @natgeopristineseas conducted a 650 mile expedition in partnership with @oceanoazulfoundation and @waittfoundation.  The recently wrapped journey consisted of 600 dives, during which the team discovered a new field of hydrothermal vents and mapped 21,469 square kilometers of previously undocumented sea floor. Photo by @pelayosalinas #insidenatgeo

The waters of Portugal's Azores archipelago are home to some of the most crucial ecosystems in the North Atlantic, including megafauna hotspots that host whales, dolphins, and deep-sea sharks. Eager to explore the area's never-surveyed seamounts, the @natgeopristineseas conducted a 650 mile expedition in partnership with @oceanoazulfoundation and @waittfoundation. The recently wrapped journey consisted of 600 dives, during which the team discovered a new field of hydrothermal vents and mapped 21,469 square kilometers of previously undocumented sea floor. Photo by @pelayosalinas #insidenatgeo - 3 days ago

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On this day in 1960, a 26-year-old Jane Goodall landed in what is now Tanzania's Gombe Stream National Park to begin her groundbreaking study of chimpanzee behavior. Goodall's field research transformed the world's understanding of what it means to be human—a milestone we're celebrating on @janegoodallinst's #WorldChimpanzeeDay. Photo: Hugo van Lawick. 
#insidenatgeo

On this day in 1960, a 26-year-old Jane Goodall landed in what is now Tanzania's Gombe Stream National Park to begin her groundbreaking study of chimpanzee behavior. Goodall's field research transformed the world's understanding of what it means to be human—a milestone we're celebrating on @janegoodallinst 's #WorldChimpanzeeDay . Photo: Hugo van Lawick. #insidenatgeo - 4 days ago

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As a 2018 Grosvenor Teacher Fellow, Trevor Hence traveled to Norway's Fjords and Arctic Svalbard for a hands-on, field-based expedition intended to enhance his commitment to geographic learning. "I've had the opportunity to model concepts like challenge, exploration, and contribution beyond campus and into the most remote remaining pristine places on earth," says the Texas-based elementary school teacher, "It shows students that we practice what we preach." Tap the link in our bio to learn more about the Grosvenor Teacher Fellow Program, including how to apply. Made possible through a partnership between National Geographic and @lindbladexp. #insidenatgeo #lindbladexpeditions

As a 2018 Grosvenor Teacher Fellow, Trevor Hence traveled to Norway's Fjords and Arctic Svalbard for a hands-on, field-based expedition intended to enhance his commitment to geographic learning. "I've had the opportunity to model concepts like challenge, exploration, and contribution beyond campus and into the most remote remaining pristine places on earth," says the Texas-based elementary school teacher, "It shows students that we practice what we preach." Tap the link in our bio to learn more about the Grosvenor Teacher Fellow Program, including how to apply. Made possible through a partnership between National Geographic and @lindbladexp. #insidenatgeo #lindbladexpeditions - 5 days ago

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“Mars is not an option. There is no exit strategy for our planet," urged famed ocean explorer Bob Ballard at last month's #natgeofest. #insidenatgeo

“Mars is not an option. There is no exit strategy for our planet," urged famed ocean explorer Bob Ballard at last month's #natgeofest . #insidenatgeo - 5 days ago

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Of all the mammals on earth, only 4% are wild animals—the remaining 96% are humans and livestock. At #natgeofest, Chief Scientist @jonathanembaillie emphasized the need to decrease the human footprint and give wildlife more space, a message worth remembering this #worldpopulationday. #insidenatgeo

Of all the mammals on earth, only 4% are wild animals—the remaining 96% are humans and livestock. At #natgeofest , Chief Scientist @jonathanembaillie emphasized the need to decrease the human footprint and give wildlife more space, a message worth remembering this #worldpopulationday . #insidenatgeo - 7 days ago

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"Most people think the worst thing that can happen to the ocean is an oil spill, but it’s not," says famed oceanographer Sylvia Earle. "We are seeing another kind of oil spill. It’s an oil spill translated into those many things we call plastics." Link in bio to learn more about what we're doing to curb the threat of single-use plastics. #planetorplastic #plasticfreejuly

"Most people think the worst thing that can happen to the ocean is an oil spill, but it’s not," says famed oceanographer Sylvia Earle. "We are seeing another kind of oil spill. It’s an oil spill translated into those many things we call plastics." Link in bio to learn more about what we're doing to curb the threat of single-use plastics. #planetorplastic #plasticfreejuly - 8 days ago

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“Freshwater fish aren’t a priority in wildlife conservation circles,” says Nat Geo Explorer Zeb Hogan, who's been researching Southeast Asia's endangered giant fish since 1997. So when friends flagged that restaurants are serving the species he studies (including fish so rare that a few deaths could tip the species toward extinction), the biologist knew he had to take action. With the help of National Geographic, Hogan set out to find basic answers about how megafish are being illegally sourced and sold. Link in bio to learn more about what he's found. 📷: @phamhaduylinh #insidenatgeo

“Freshwater fish aren’t a priority in wildlife conservation circles,” says Nat Geo Explorer Zeb Hogan, who's been researching Southeast Asia's endangered giant fish since 1997. So when friends flagged that restaurants are serving the species he studies (including fish so rare that a few deaths could tip the species toward extinction), the biologist knew he had to take action. With the help of National Geographic, Hogan set out to find basic answers about how megafish are being illegally sourced and sold. Link in bio to learn more about what he's found. : @phamhaduylinh #insidenatgeo - 9 days ago

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“Let’s make sure that every girl knows that if we support her, she can change the world,” said Lyda Hill Foundation President Nicole Small, who presented a $1 million grant to the National Geographic Society for women in the field. The gift, which was announced during last month's #natgeofest, will provide more than 60 female National Geographic Explorers with much-needed capital and support for trainings, professional development, and family and dependent care costs. #insidenatgeo

“Let’s make sure that every girl knows that if we support her, she can change the world,” said Lyda Hill Foundation President Nicole Small, who presented a $1 million grant to the National Geographic Society for women in the field. The gift, which was announced during last month's #natgeofest , will provide more than 60 female National Geographic Explorers with much-needed capital and support for trainings, professional development, and family and dependent care costs. #insidenatgeo - 10 days ago

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The 367.8 foot "Libby" tree was first measured in 1963 during a National Geographic expedition led by Paul Zahl, solidifying its place as the tallest tree in the world until a storm took ten feet off its stature. But the discovery and a subsequent plea to preserve 58,000 acres of redwood forest (an article titled "A Park to Save the Tallest Trees" in a July 1966 issue of National Geographic magazine), spurred a campaign to protect the area now known as @redwoodnps. Established thanks to a campaign led by the Save-the-Redwoods League and aided by @sierraclub and the National Geographic Society, the preserved forest now covers 130,000 acres of land. Photos: Paul Zahl / B. Anthony Stewart / J. Baylor Roberts #insidenatgeo #findyourpark

The 367.8 foot "Libby" tree was first measured in 1963 during a National Geographic expedition led by Paul Zahl, solidifying its place as the tallest tree in the world until a storm took ten feet off its stature. But the discovery and a subsequent plea to preserve 58,000 acres of redwood forest (an article titled "A Park to Save the Tallest Trees" in a July 1966 issue of National Geographic magazine), spurred a campaign to protect the area now known as @redwoodnps. Established thanks to a campaign led by the Save-the-Redwoods League and aided by @sierraclub and the National Geographic Society, the preserved forest now covers 130,000 acres of land. Photos: Paul Zahl / B. Anthony Stewart / J. Baylor Roberts #insidenatgeo #findyourpark - 11 days ago

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"Wilderness is our natural habitat. We need these last wild places to reconnect with who we really are," explains Explorer Steve Boyes in a recent TED Talk. In an effort to protect Africa's Okavango River Basin, a wetland habitat which spans an area larger than California, @drsteveboyes and the @intotheokavango team have spent years navigating its rivers on a research transect, documenting wildlife and water quality and dodging active mindfields. "I'm doing this because we need this information to benchmark this near-pristine before upstream development happens." Link to the full @ted talk in our bio. #insidenatgeo

"Wilderness is our natural habitat. We need these last wild places to reconnect with who we really are," explains Explorer Steve Boyes in a recent TED Talk. In an effort to protect Africa's Okavango River Basin, a wetland habitat which spans an area larger than California, @drsteveboyes and the @intotheokavango team have spent years navigating its rivers on a research transect, documenting wildlife and water quality and dodging active mindfields. "I'm doing this because we need this information to benchmark this near-pristine before upstream development happens." Link to the full @ted talk in our bio. #insidenatgeo - 12 days ago

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"I want to use technology to immerse students in places they may never get to go," says Grosvenor Teacher Fellow @pegkeiner, who serves as her school's Director of Innovation (though she also claims to go by "Director of 'What If?'" and "Computer Lady"). The Grosvenor Teacher Fellow Program is made possible by a partnership between National Geographic and @lindbladexp. #natgeofest #insidenatgeo

"I want to use technology to immerse students in places they may never get to go," says Grosvenor Teacher Fellow @pegkeiner , who serves as her school's Director of Innovation (though she also claims to go by "Director of 'What If?'" and "Computer Lady"). The Grosvenor Teacher Fellow Program is made possible by a partnership between National Geographic and @lindbladexp. #natgeofest #insidenatgeo - 13 days ago

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Happy Fourth. 📷: Melville Bell Grosvenor, published in a 1930 issue of @natgeo magazine. This image is among one of the first aerial color photographs ever (successfully) taken. #insidenatgeo #july4th

Happy Fourth. : Melville Bell Grosvenor, published in a 1930 issue of @natgeo magazine. This image is among one of the first aerial color photographs ever (successfully) taken. #insidenatgeo #july4th - 14 days ago

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What happens when you recycle plastic? For over 25 years, wealthy nations (including America) exported their plastic waste, with China taking the lion's share. But earlier, this year, China placed a ban on plastic waste imports—and “recycled” plastics are winding up in landfills. “I think it is probably going to be harder before it gets easier,” says engineer and Nat Geo Explorer Jenna Jambeck, whose newly published study found that China's new policy could displace as much as 111 million metric tons of plastic waste by 2030. But this could be the opportunity the United States needs to revamp its recycling systems and rethink plastic products. Link in bio to learn more. #planetorplastic #insidenatgeo

What happens when you recycle plastic? For over 25 years, wealthy nations (including America) exported their plastic waste, with China taking the lion's share. But earlier, this year, China placed a ban on plastic waste imports—and “recycled” plastics are winding up in landfills. “I think it is probably going to be harder before it gets easier,” says engineer and Nat Geo Explorer Jenna Jambeck, whose newly published study found that China's new policy could displace as much as 111 million metric tons of plastic waste by 2030. But this could be the opportunity the United States needs to revamp its recycling systems and rethink plastic products. Link in bio to learn more. #planetorplastic #insidenatgeo - 15 days ago

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Back in 2002, Steve Fossett, an aviator who leveraged his considerable wealth to set world records in the sea and sky, became the first person to circumnavigate the world in a solo hot-air balloon flight. Today marks the anniversary of this exploit, which took him several years to perfect—photographer and Nat Geo Explorer @joelsartore documented his efforts in 1996. Fossett, who received an Award of Special Recognition from the Nat Geo Expeditions Council, died in a 2007 plane crash while scouting his next adventure. #insidenatgeo

Back in 2002, Steve Fossett, an aviator who leveraged his considerable wealth to set world records in the sea and sky, became the first person to circumnavigate the world in a solo hot-air balloon flight. Today marks the anniversary of this exploit, which took him several years to perfect—photographer and Nat Geo Explorer @joelsartore documented his efforts in 1996. Fossett, who received an Award of Special Recognition from the Nat Geo Expeditions Council, died in a 2007 plane crash while scouting his next adventure. #insidenatgeo - 16 days ago

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America's first zoo opened in Philadelphia on this day in 1874, giving people a face-to-face connection with both common and rare wildlife. Photo: Bates Littlehales #insidenatgeo

America's first zoo opened in Philadelphia on this day in 1874, giving people a face-to-face connection with both common and rare wildlife. Photo: Bates Littlehales #insidenatgeo - 17 days ago

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“For the first time, I was working on a real problem to which no one had an answer,’’ says astronomer and Nat Geo Explorer Munazza Alam, who began studying brown dwarves (or failed stars that eventually cool to resemble gas planets) in college. Since today marks #AsteroidDay2018, officially designated by the UN to spread awareness about asteroid science, consider following in Munazza's footsteps & looking beyond our planet (@asteroidday for more details). #insidenatgeo

“For the first time, I was working on a real problem to which no one had an answer,’’ says astronomer and Nat Geo Explorer Munazza Alam, who began studying brown dwarves (or failed stars that eventually cool to resemble gas planets) in college. Since today marks #AsteroidDay2018 , officially designated by the UN to spread awareness about asteroid science, consider following in Munazza's footsteps & looking beyond our planet (@asteroidday for more details). #insidenatgeo - 18 days ago

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