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National Geographic

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photographs by @vincentjmusi

Louis, 2018

Size mattered greatly in the formative years of Louis, a Pug formerly known as Meatball, formerly known as a doggie in the window of a New York City pet shop where he was seen daily until he wasn’t.

Meatball had grown too big for the window and was reassigned to, shall we say, a less than prominent position in the store when his owner-to-be, came-to-be looking for him.

And while Meatball may have been too large for the window, the Pug now known as Louis was just small enough to be smuggled in and out past the doorman of a no-dogs-allowed building.

The things we do for love.

Size matters less these days to this 12 year-old, although his five front teeth are locked in a constant battle for space with his tongue. A world traveler, he has exquisite taste in food, music, women and cats. Between his frequent naps, Louis is known to regale visitors with colorful stories about his time living in the city that never sleeps.

This #yearofthedogs dispatch from @vincentjmusi
is part of an ongoing personal project celebrating the beauty and character of these amazing creatures we share our homes and families and lives with.

photographs by @vincentjmusi Louis, 2018 Size mattered greatly in the formative years of Louis, a Pug formerly known as Meatball, formerly known as a doggie in the window of a New York City pet shop where he was seen daily until he wasn’t. Meatball had grown too big for the window and was reassigned to, shall we say, a less than prominent position in the store when his owner-to-be, came-to-be looking for him. And while Meatball may have been too large for the window, the Pug now known as Louis was just small enough to be smuggled in and out past the doorman of a no-dogs-allowed building. The things we do for love. Size matters less these days to this 12 year-old, although his five front teeth are locked in a constant battle for space with his tongue. A world traveler, he has exquisite taste in food, music, women and cats. Between his frequent naps, Louis is known to regale visitors with colorful stories about his time living in the city that never sleeps. This #yearofthedogs dispatch from @vincentjmusi is part of an ongoing personal project celebrating the beauty and character of these amazing creatures we share our homes and families and lives with. - 6 hours ago

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Photo by @kchete77 (Karla Gachet) | Hundreds of activists rallied from MacArthur Park, to Eco Park to Olvera Street in Los Angeles on September 10th, 2017. They were protesting against  the Trump administration's efforts  to end DACA. This would phase out protections from deportation for roughly 800,000 immigrants brought into the country illegally by their parents. In the photo a Trump supporter screams with a megaphone at the protesters passing by to go back to where they came from. 
This photo was shot #onassignment for @natgeo with @ivankphoto. It was published in the July 2018 issue in the feature: “How Latinos Are Shaping America’s Future.” #Latinos #activism #dreamers #DACA # #latinxpower #facesofthefuture #losangeles #mydreamsarebiggerthanyourwalls #protest  #students #trumpsupporters

Photo by @kchete77 (Karla Gachet) | Hundreds of activists rallied from MacArthur Park, to Eco Park to Olvera Street in Los Angeles on September 10th, 2017. They were protesting against the Trump administration's efforts to end DACA. This would phase out protections from deportation for roughly 800,000 immigrants brought into the country illegally by their parents. In the photo a Trump supporter screams with a megaphone at the protesters passing by to go back to where they came from. This photo was shot #onassignment for @natgeo with @ivankphoto. It was published in the July 2018 issue in the feature: “How Latinos Are Shaping America’s Future.” #Latinos #activism #dreamers #DACA # #latinxpower #facesofthefuture #losangeles #mydreamsarebiggerthanyourwalls #protest #students #trumpsupporters - 8 hours ago

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Image by @beverlyjoubert. Where shadows become the solid form and striped backs are lost in the light. The early morning creates an interesting illusion in the shallow waters of the Makgadikgadi Salt Pans as zebras follow ancient migratory paths. This is a migration that was thought to be lost following the erection of vast fences to keep cattle and wildlife separate. However, a key fence has been dropped and despite numerous generations of zebras being unable to walk this route, they have once again followed their instincts and have returned. Follow @beverlyjoubert for more. #zebramigration #zebramigrationbotswana #shadows #illusions #makgadikgadi

Image by @beverlyjoubert. Where shadows become the solid form and striped backs are lost in the light. The early morning creates an interesting illusion in the shallow waters of the Makgadikgadi Salt Pans as zebras follow ancient migratory paths. This is a migration that was thought to be lost following the erection of vast fences to keep cattle and wildlife separate. However, a key fence has been dropped and despite numerous generations of zebras being unable to walk this route, they have once again followed their instincts and have returned. Follow @beverlyjoubert for more. #zebramigration #zebramigrationbotswana #shadows #illusions #makgadikgadi - 11 hours ago

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Video by @joelsartore |
This spectacular bird is an Andean Cock-of-the-rock, photographed at @dallas_world_aquarium. The national bird of Peru, this species is easily identified by its fan-shaped crest and brilliant orange plumage. They get their name from their preference for rocks and ledges as the base for their mud cup nests, which the females are responsible for building. Males gather in groups in a location called a lek to perform elaborate courtship displays. They even try to attract females with a call that sounds like a pig squealing! They bob up and down, bowing and hopping around to display their bright plumage. Males will mate with more than one female and, once she lays her eggs, she cares for the chicks by herself. Follow @joelsartore to see another video of this spectacular bird! #PhotoArk #andeancockoftherock

Video by @joelsartore | This spectacular bird is an Andean Cock-of-the-rock, photographed at @dallas_world_aquarium. The national bird of Peru, this species is easily identified by its fan-shaped crest and brilliant orange plumage. They get their name from their preference for rocks and ledges as the base for their mud cup nests, which the females are responsible for building. Males gather in groups in a location called a lek to perform elaborate courtship displays. They even try to attract females with a call that sounds like a pig squealing! They bob up and down, bowing and hopping around to display their bright plumage. Males will mate with more than one female and, once she lays her eggs, she cares for the chicks by herself. Follow @joelsartore to see another video of this spectacular bird! #PhotoArk #andeancockoftherock - 13 hours ago

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Photo by @CarltonWard | For the past two years I have been pursuing Florida panthers with camera traps — the only reliable method for photographing them. But a few weeks ago, at Audubon's @CorkscrewSwamp, I had an encounter that I'll be talking about the rest of my life. I was driving into the backcountry and rounded a corner to see a panther sitting in the dirt road. I grabbed a telephoto lens and nervously snapped a few fuzzy frames through the windshield before rolling a little closer and pulling off to the side. The panther was still 150 yards away in harsh 3 PM light. When filmmaker Eric Bendick called, I was just watching. I whispered that I was staring at a real-life panther. The conference about our panther film would have to wait. Eric told me to take some video, and with the panther still far away in bad light, I complied, not realizing how jacked up I was until trying to hold my iPhone steady. After a few seconds of jittery self-narration, the panther started walking right towards me. When it sat back down in the road I resumed my video, but the panther started walking toward me again! I switched to my main camera, put it in silent mode and held my breath. The panther kept coming, skirting the edge of the swamp behind grass and low palms. I let the shutter rip every time it revealed itself, coming closer with every step. Then it walked within 20 yards of my truck and sat down in an island of palms directly out my window! I filled the frame with its body and looked straight into its piercing eyes! I had mistaken it for a young male by its height, but was corrected when a ruffling in the palms transformed into a kitten. When the little guy got closer, its mother stood and continued down the road. Then they vanished into a thick hammock leaving me alone with my thoughts. When I went to change the batteries in my nearby camera trap, the process felt mechanical and empty. Remote cameras are invaluable. But it’s a whole different experience when the panther is looking right back at you! I am thankful @audubonsociety for protecting this place and giving me access their land. Please join me @carltonward to follow the #PathofthePanther for @NatGeo #FloridaWild

Photo by @CarltonWard | For the past two years I have been pursuing Florida panthers with camera traps — the only reliable method for photographing them. But a few weeks ago, at Audubon's @CorkscrewSwamp , I had an encounter that I'll be talking about the rest of my life. I was driving into the backcountry and rounded a corner to see a panther sitting in the dirt road. I grabbed a telephoto lens and nervously snapped a few fuzzy frames through the windshield before rolling a little closer and pulling off to the side. The panther was still 150 yards away in harsh 3 PM light. When filmmaker Eric Bendick called, I was just watching. I whispered that I was staring at a real-life panther. The conference about our panther film would have to wait. Eric told me to take some video, and with the panther still far away in bad light, I complied, not realizing how jacked up I was until trying to hold my iPhone steady. After a few seconds of jittery self-narration, the panther started walking right towards me. When it sat back down in the road I resumed my video, but the panther started walking toward me again! I switched to my main camera, put it in silent mode and held my breath. The panther kept coming, skirting the edge of the swamp behind grass and low palms. I let the shutter rip every time it revealed itself, coming closer with every step. Then it walked within 20 yards of my truck and sat down in an island of palms directly out my window! I filled the frame with its body and looked straight into its piercing eyes! I had mistaken it for a young male by its height, but was corrected when a ruffling in the palms transformed into a kitten. When the little guy got closer, its mother stood and continued down the road. Then they vanished into a thick hammock leaving me alone with my thoughts. When I went to change the batteries in my nearby camera trap, the process felt mechanical and empty. Remote cameras are invaluable. But it’s a whole different experience when the panther is looking right back at you! I am thankful @audubonsociety for protecting this place and giving me access their land. Please join me @carltonward to follow the #PathofthePanther for @NatGeo #FloridaWild - 16 hours ago

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Photo @tbfrost | Words @paulrosolie 
There is a reason big fish, and big crocs, and snakes for that matter too, live to see old age: they are shrewd. A few years ago my team and I caught the world record for longest live, verifiably measured wild anaconda. We named her Eleanor after my grandmother. She was resting on floating vegetation in the warm morning sun. The giant anacondas love the floating grasses because if any threat comes, they can dive under immediately. From the tip of a large canoe I saw her, and she saw me, and immediately started going down. Clever girl. When I splashed into the swamp to where she was and wrapped my arms around her it was with the full knowledge that this nearly twenty-foot snake was in full control. She weighed more, was stronger, could swim better, and had dozens of re-curved teeth to use in her defense. The team of 8 researchers with me jumped in too and all of them tried to grab parts of her, but there was nothing to stand on - the water was 20 plus feet deep. We held onto her tail as she thrashed around, and for a moment coils as thick as any of us were emerging and splashing everywhere. It was like fighting the Cracken. When I got control of her head I lost control of everything else, I could no longer swim and could no longer protect from her coils. It was the rest of the team that kept me afloat, and hauled me – and the snake - up onto the boat so that we could measure her and collect data, the first information gathered on green anacondas in the Peruvian Amazon. You can’t tranquilize an anaconda, so for now studying them has to be done the old-school way. Thankfully, not all of them are that hard - or dangerous - to catch, like this small 6 foot female we found on the edge of stream in a swamp. Doesn’t matter how small or large the snake is though, each anaconda I work with I consider the privilege of a lifetime. 
To see more photos of this anaconda, which is the largest species of snake in the world , I’m @tbfrost 
#snakesofinstagram #peru #amazon  #anacondas #giantsnakes #scalesandskin

Photo @tbfrost | Words @paulrosolie There is a reason big fish, and big crocs, and snakes for that matter too, live to see old age: they are shrewd. A few years ago my team and I caught the world record for longest live, verifiably measured wild anaconda. We named her Eleanor after my grandmother. She was resting on floating vegetation in the warm morning sun. The giant anacondas love the floating grasses because if any threat comes, they can dive under immediately. From the tip of a large canoe I saw her, and she saw me, and immediately started going down. Clever girl. When I splashed into the swamp to where she was and wrapped my arms around her it was with the full knowledge that this nearly twenty-foot snake was in full control. She weighed more, was stronger, could swim better, and had dozens of re-curved teeth to use in her defense. The team of 8 researchers with me jumped in too and all of them tried to grab parts of her, but there was nothing to stand on - the water was 20 plus feet deep. We held onto her tail as she thrashed around, and for a moment coils as thick as any of us were emerging and splashing everywhere. It was like fighting the Cracken. When I got control of her head I lost control of everything else, I could no longer swim and could no longer protect from her coils. It was the rest of the team that kept me afloat, and hauled me – and the snake - up onto the boat so that we could measure her and collect data, the first information gathered on green anacondas in the Peruvian Amazon. You can’t tranquilize an anaconda, so for now studying them has to be done the old-school way. Thankfully, not all of them are that hard - or dangerous - to catch, like this small 6 foot female we found on the edge of stream in a swamp. Doesn’t matter how small or large the snake is though, each anaconda I work with I consider the privilege of a lifetime. To see more photos of this anaconda, which is the largest species of snake in the world , I’m @tbfrost #snakesofinstagram #peru #amazon #anacondas #giantsnakes #scalesandskin - 18 hours ago

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Photograph by David Chancellor @chancellordavid - incredible cloud structure this evening here in the Cairngorm National Park, Scotland - on Invermark looking across the moors painted with the extraordinary colours of the flowering bell heather -  #conserving #wildlife #wildfire #scotland #cairngormsnationalpark

Photograph by David Chancellor @chancellordavid - incredible cloud structure this evening here in the Cairngorm National Park, Scotland - on Invermark looking across the moors painted with the extraordinary colours of the flowering bell heather - #conserving #wildlife #wildfire #scotland #cairngormsnationalpark - 21 hours ago

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Photograph by @limauricio | Mauricio Lima
.
French football fans celebrate their 4-2 win over Croatia near The Eiffel Tower, after winning the World Cup for the second time in its history. In Paris, vast crowds celebrated all night long under “Allez les Bleus” and “On est les champions” chants throughout the city.

#WorldCup2018 #Russia #France #Croatia #Paris #LaTourEiffel #EiffelTower #football #celebration #fans

Photograph by @limauricio | Mauricio Lima . French football fans celebrate their 4-2 win over Croatia near The Eiffel Tower, after winning the World Cup for the second time in its history. In Paris, vast crowds celebrated all night long under “Allez les Bleus” and “On est les champions” chants throughout the city. #WorldCup2018 #Russia #France #Croatia #Paris #LaTourEiffel #EiffelTower #football #celebration #fans - 21 hours ago

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Photo by @mmuheisen (Muhammed Muheisen) 34-year-old Syrian refugee Riyad Khalil changes the diaper of his 14-month-old son Hassan, in a camp north of Athens, Greece on the 4th of July 2018. For more photos and videos of the refugee crisis follow me @mmuheisen and @everydayrefugees #everydayrefugees #muhammedmuheisen

Photo by @mmuheisen (Muhammed Muheisen) 34-year-old Syrian refugee Riyad Khalil changes the diaper of his 14-month-old son Hassan, in a camp north of Athens, Greece on the 4th of July 2018. For more photos and videos of the refugee crisis follow me @mmuheisen and @everydayrefugees #everydayrefugees #muhammedmuheisen - 24 hours ago

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Photo by @amivitale | A newborn giant panda cub is weighed at the Bifengxia Giant Panda Breeding and Research Center in Sichuan Province, China. In the wild, once they’ve grown to adulthood, female pandas may weigh up to 220 pounds and males up to 250 pounds, and they’ll range from four to six feet long.

I have recently published my new book, Panda Love, featuring my long-term panda work made on assignment for National Geographic. See more on my feed @amivitale.

#pandamonium @natgeo @natgeocreative @thephotosociety #sichuan #china #climatechange #conservation #savetheplanet #panda #pandas #babypanda #ipanda #giantpanda #pandacub #photojournalism #amivitale #cuteanimals

Photo by @amivitale | A newborn giant panda cub is weighed at the Bifengxia Giant Panda Breeding and Research Center in Sichuan Province, China. In the wild, once they’ve grown to adulthood, female pandas may weigh up to 220 pounds and males up to 250 pounds, and they’ll range from four to six feet long. I have recently published my new book, Panda Love, featuring my long-term panda work made on assignment for National Geographic. See more on my feed @amivitale. #pandamonium @natgeo @natgeocreative @thephotosociety #sichuan #china #climatechange #conservation #savetheplanet #panda #pandas #babypanda #ipanda #giantpanda #pandacub #photojournalism #amivitale #cuteanimals - 1 day ago

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Photo by @kengeiger | A @natgeochannel drone streaks through the night sky to document newly discovered geoglyphs in the Peruvian desert south of Lima, Peru's modern capital. These geoglyphs were created more than 2000 years ago, by the Paracas culture. Predating the Nasca lines—many of these older lines depict humans, such as dancers and warriors. The vast geometric designs etched in the desert ground have mystified the world for nearly a century. Employing drone camera technology, Peruvian archaeologists Luis Jaime Castillo (a Natgeo Explorer) and Johny Isla are mapping and restoring scores of previously unknown geoglyphs. Their discoveries are explored in the @natgeochannel program, Nasca Lines: Ancient Secrets, airing Tuesday July 17th at 10:00pm EST. 
Shot on assignment for @natgeochannel, just outside Palpa, Peru. #peru #nasca #palpa

Photo by @kengeiger | A @natgeochannel drone streaks through the night sky to document newly discovered geoglyphs in the Peruvian desert south of Lima, Peru's modern capital. These geoglyphs were created more than 2000 years ago, by the Paracas culture. Predating the Nasca lines—many of these older lines depict humans, such as dancers and warriors. The vast geometric designs etched in the desert ground have mystified the world for nearly a century. Employing drone camera technology, Peruvian archaeologists Luis Jaime Castillo (a Natgeo Explorer) and Johny Isla are mapping and restoring scores of previously unknown geoglyphs. Their discoveries are explored in the @natgeochannel program, Nasca Lines: Ancient Secrets, airing Tuesday July 17th at 10:00pm EST. Shot on assignment for @natgeochannel , just outside Palpa, Peru. #peru #nasca #palpa - 1 day ago

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Photo by @hannahreyesmorales | The French celebrate their 4-2 victory over Croatia in the #WorldCup2018 final, 20 years after winning their first world cup.

Photo by @hannahreyesmorales | The French celebrate their 4-2 victory over Croatia in the #WorldCup2018 final, 20 years after winning their first world cup. - 1 day ago

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